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Mon, 19 Mar 2018 14:49:00 +0000

Defer tax with a Section 1031 exchange, but new limits apply this year

Normally when appreciated business assets such as real estate are sold, tax is owed on the appreciation. But there’s a way to defer this tax: a Section 1031 “like kind” exchange. However, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) reduces the types of property eligible for this favorable tax treatment.

What is a like-kind exchange?
Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code allows you to defer gains on real or personal property used in a business or held for investment if, instead of selling it, you exchange it solely for property of a “like kind.” Thus, the tax benefit of an exchange is that you defer tax and, thereby, have use of the tax savings until you sell the replacement property.

This technique is especially flexible for real estate, because virtually any type of real estate will be considered to be of a like kind, as long as it’s business or investment property. For example, you can exchange a warehouse for an office building, or an apartment complex for a strip mall.

Deferred and reverse exchanges
Although a like-kind exchange may sound quick and easy, it’s relatively rare for two owners to simply swap properties. You’ll likely have to execute a “deferred” exchange, in which you engage a qualified intermediary (QI) for assistance.

When you sell your property (the relinquished property), the net proceeds go directly to the QI, who then uses them to buy replacement property. To qualify for tax-deferred exchange treatment, you generally must identify replacement property within 45 days after you transfer the relinquished property and complete the purchase within 180 days after the initial transfer.

An alternate approach is a “reverse” exchange. Here, an exchange accommodation titleholder (EAT) acquires title to the replacement property before you sell the relinquished property. You can defer capital gains by identifying one or more properties to exchange within 45 days after the EAT receives the replacement property and, typically, completing the transaction within 180 days.

Changes under the TCJA
There had been some concern that tax reform would include the elimination of like-kind exchanges. The good news is that the TCJA still generally allows tax-deferred like-kind exchanges of business and investment real estate.

But there’s also some bad news: For 2018 and beyond, the TCJA eliminates tax-deferred like-kind exchange treatment for exchanges of personal property. However, prior-law rules that allow like-kind exchanges of personal property still apply if one leg of an exchange was completed by December 31, 2017, but one leg remained open on that date. Keep in mind that exchanged personal property must be of the same asset or product class.

Complex rules
The rules for like-kind exchanges are complex, so these arrangements present some risks. If, say, you exchange the wrong kind of property or acquire cash or other non-like-kind property in a deal, you may still end up incurring a sizable tax hit. If you’re exploring a like-kind exchange, contact me at (856)665-2121. I can help you ensure you’re in compliance with the rules

April 1 Deadline for Required Minimum Distributions

Mon, 19 Mar 2018 01:04:00 +0000
Taxpayers who reached the age 70 and a half during 2017 must, in most cases, start receiving required minimum distributions (RMDs) from Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) and workplace retirement plans by Sunday, April 1, 2018. The April 1 deadline applies to all employer-sponsored retirement plans, including profit-sharing plans, 401(k) plans, 403(b) plans, 457(b) plans and traditional IRAs and IRA-based plans.

Please See:IRS Notice

March 15 deadline for LLC's, Partnerships, S Corporations

Mon, 05 Mar 2018 16:08:00 +0000

Don’t forget: 2017 tax filing deadline for pass-through entities is March 15

When it comes to income tax returns, April 15 (actually April 17 this year, because of a weekend and a Washington, D.C., holiday) isn’t the only deadline taxpayers need to think about. The federal income tax filing deadline for calendar-year partnerships, S corporations and limited liability companies (LLCs) treated as partnerships or S corporations for tax purposes is March 15. While this has been the S corporation deadline for a long time, it’s only the second year the partnership deadline has been in March rather than in April.
Why the deadline change?
One of the primary reasons for moving up the partnership filing deadline was to make it easier for owners to file their personal returns by the April filing deadline. After all, partnership (and S corporation) income passes through to the owners. The earlier date allows owners to use the information contained in the pass-through entity forms to file their personal returns.
What about fiscal-year entities?
For partnerships with fiscal year ends, tax returns are now due the 15th day of the third month after the close of the tax year. The same deadline applies to fiscal-year S corporations. Under prior law, returns for fiscal-year partnerships were due the 15th day of the fourth month after the close of the fiscal tax year.
What about extensions?
If you haven’t filed your calendar-year partnership or S corporation return yet, you may be thinking about an extension. Under the current law, the maximum extension for calendar-year partnerships is six months (until September 17, 2018, for 2017 returns). This is up from five months under prior law. So the extension deadline is the same — only the length of the extension has changed. The extension deadline for calendar-year S corporations also is September 17, 2018, for 2017 returns.
Whether you’ll be filing a partnership or an S corporation return, you must file for the extension by March 15 if it’s a calendar-year entity.
When does an extension make sense?
Filing for an extension can be tax-smart if you’re missing critical documents or you face unexpected life events that prevent you from devoting sufficient time to your return right now.
But keep in mind that, to avoid potential interest and penalties, you still must (with a few exceptions) pay any tax due by the unextended deadline. There may not be any tax liability from the partnership or S corporation return. If, however, filing for an extension for the entity return causes you to also have to file an extension for your personal return, you need to keep this in mind related to the individual tax return April 17 deadline.
Have more questions about the filing deadlines that apply to you or avoiding interest and penalties? Contact me at (856) 665-2121 Read More...

Sec 179 Expensing

Mon, 26 Feb 2018 21:11:00 +0000

Sec. 179 expensing provides small businesses tax savings on 2017 returns — and more savings in the future

If you purchased qualifying property by December 31, 2017, you may be able to take advantage of Section 179 expensing on your 2017 tax return. You’ll also want to keep this tax break in mind in your property purchase planning, because the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), signed into law this past December, significantly enhances it beginning in 2018.

2017 Sec. 179 benefits
Sec. 179 expensing allows eligible taxpayers to deduct the entire cost of qualifying new or used depreciable property and most software in Year 1, subject to various limitations. For tax years that began in 2017, the maximum Sec. 179 deduction is $510,000. The maximum deduction is phased out dollar for dollar to the extent the cost of eligible property placed in service during the tax year exceeds the phaseout threshold of $2.03 million.
Qualified real property improvement costs are also eligible for Sec. 179 expensing. This real estate break applies to:
  • Certain improvements to interiors of leased nonresidential buildings,
  • Certain restaurant buildings or improvements to such buildings, and
  • Certain improvements to the interiors of retail buildings.
Deductions claimed for qualified real property costs count against the overall maximum for Sec. 179 expensing.

Permanent enhancements
The TCJA permanently enhances Sec. 179 expensing. Under the new law, for qualifying property placed in service in tax years beginning in 2018, the maximum Sec. 179 deduction is increased to $1 million, and the phaseout threshold is increased to $2.5 million. For later tax years, these amounts will be indexed for inflation. For purposes of determining eligibility for these higher limits, the property is treated as acquired on the date on which a written binding contract for the acquisition is signed.

The new law also expands the definition of eligible property to include certain depreciable tangible personal property used predominantly to furnish lodging. The definition of qualified real property eligible for Sec. 179 expensing is also expanded to include the following improvements to nonresidential real property: roofs, HVAC equipment, fire protection and alarm systems, and security systems.

Save now and save later
Many rules apply, so please contact us to learn if you qualify for this break on your 2017 return. I would be happy to discuss your future purchasing plans so you can reap the maximum benefits from enhanced Sec. 179 expensing and other tax law changes under the TCJA. Read More...

Tax credit for hiring

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 17:28:00 +0000

Tax credit for hiring from certain “target groups” can provide substantial tax savings

Many businesses hired in 2017, and more are planning to hire in 2018. If you’re among them and your hires include members of a “target group,” you may be eligible for the Work Opportunity tax credit (WOTC). If you made qualifying hires in 2017 and obtained proper certification, you can claim the WOTC on your 2017 tax return.

Whether or not you’re eligible for 2017, keep the WOTC in mind in your 2018 hiring plans. Despite its proposed elimination under the House’s version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the credit survived the final version that was signed into law in December, so it’s also available for 2018.

“Target groups,” defined
Target groups include:
  • Qualified individuals who have been unemployed for 27 weeks or more,
  • Designated community residents who live in Empowerment Zones or rural renewal counties,
  • Long-term family assistance recipients,
  • Qualified ex-felons,
  • Qualified recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF),
  • Qualified veterans,
  • Summer youth employees,
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients,
  • Supplemental Security Income benefits recipients, and
  • Vocational rehabilitation referrals for individuals who suffer from an employment handicap resulting from a physical or mental handicap.
Before you can claim the WOTC, you must obtain certification from a “designated local agency” (DLA) that the hired individual is indeed a target group member. You must submit IRS Form 8850, “Pre-Screening Notice and Certification Request for the Work Opportunity Credit,” to the DLA no later than the 28th day after the individual begins work for you. Unfortunately, this means that, if you hired someone from a target group in 2017 but didn’t obtain the certification, you can’t claim the WOTC on your 2017 return.

A potentially valuable credit
Qualifying employers can claim the WOTC as a general business credit against their income tax. The amount of the credit depends on the:
  • Target group of the individual hired,
  • Wages paid to that individual, and
  • Number of hours that individual worked during the first year of employment.
The maximum credit that can be earned for each member of a target group is generally $2,400 per employee. The credit can be as high as $9,600 for certain veterans.
Employers aren’t subject to a limit on the number of eligible individuals they can hire. In other words, if you hired 10 individuals from target groups that qualify for the $2,400 credit, your total credit would be $24,000.

Remember, credits reduce your tax bill dollar-for-dollar; they don’t just reduce the amount of income subject to tax like deductions do. So that’s $24,000 of actual tax savings.

Offset hiring costs
The WOTC can provide substantial tax savings when you hire qualified new employees, offsetting some of the cost. Contact me at (856) 665-2121 for more information. Read More...

SEP Plan can be started in 2018 for 2017 Tax Year!

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 16:28:00 +0000

Small business owners: A SEP may give you one last 2017 tax and retirement saving opportunity

Are you a high-income small-business owner who doesn’t currently have a tax-advantaged retirement plan set up for yourself? A Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) may be just what you need, and now may be a great time to establish one. A SEP has high contribution limits and is simple to set up. Best of all, there’s still time to establish a SEP for 2017 and make contributions to it that you can deduct on your 2017 income tax return.

2018 deadlines for 2017
A SEP can be set up as late as the due date (including extensions) of your income tax return for the tax year for which the SEP is to first apply. That means you can establish a SEP for 2017 in 2018 as long as you do it before your 2017 return filing deadline. You have until the same deadline to make 2017 contributions and still claim a potentially hefty deduction on your 2017 return.
Generally, other types of retirement plans would have to have been established by December 31, 2017, in order for 2017 contributions to be made (though many of these plans do allow 2017 contributions to be made in 2018).

High contribution limits
Contributions to SEPs are discretionary. You can decide how much to contribute each year. But be aware that, if your business has employees other than yourself: 1) Contributions must be made for all eligible employees using the same percentage of compensation as for yourself, and 2) employee accounts are immediately 100% vested. The contributions go into SEP-IRAs established for each eligible employee.

For 2017, the maximum contribution that can be made to a SEP-IRA is 25% of compensation (or 20% of self-employed income net of the self-employment tax deduction) of up to $270,000, subject to a contribution cap of $54,000. (The 2018 limits are $275,000 and $55,000, respectively.)

Simple to set up
A SEP is established by completing and signing the very simple Form 5305-SEP (“Simplified Employee Pension — Individual Retirement Accounts Contribution Agreement”). Form 5305-SEP is not filed with the IRS, but it should be maintained as part of the business’s permanent tax records. A copy of Form 5305-SEP must be given to each employee covered by the SEP, along with a disclosure statement. You can set up a SEP at banks and many stock brokerages without charge or with a very minimal fee.

Additional rules and limits do apply to SEPs, but they’re generally much less onerous than those for other retirement plans. Contact me and 856-665-2121 to learn more about SEPs and how they might reduce your tax bill for 2017 and beyond. Read More...

Is your Wittholding Correct?

Fri, 09 Feb 2018 19:31:00 +0000

Mon, 05 Feb 2018 16:16:00 +0000

Claiming bonus depreciation on your 2017 tax return may be particularly beneficial

With bonus depreciation, a business can recover the costs of depreciable property more quickly by claiming additional first-year depreciation for qualified assets. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), signed into law in December, enhances bonus depreciation.

Typically, taking this break is beneficial. But in certain situations, your business might save more tax long-term by skipping it. That said, claiming bonus depreciation on your 2017 tax return may be particularly beneficial.

Pre- and post-TCJA
Before TCJA, bonus depreciation was 50% and qualified property included new tangible property with a recovery period of 20 years or less (such as office furniture and equipment), off-the-shelf computer software, water utility property and qualified improvement property.

The TCJA significantly expands bonus depreciation: For qualified property placed in service between September 28, 2017, and December 31, 2022 (or by December 31, 2023, for certain property with longer production periods), the first-year bonus depreciation percentage increases to 100%. In addition, the 100% deduction is allowed for not just new but also used qualifying property.
But be aware that, under the TCJA, beginning in 2018 certain types of businesses may no longer be eligible for bonus depreciation. Examples include real estate businesses and auto dealerships, depending on the specific circumstances.

A good tax strategy • or not?
Generally, if you’re eligible for bonus depreciation and you expect to be in the same or a lower tax bracket in future years, taking bonus depreciation is likely a good tax strategy (though you should also factor in available Section 179 expensing). It will defer tax, which generally is beneficial.
On the other hand, if your business is growing and you expect to be in a higher tax bracket in the near future, you may be better off forgoing bonus depreciation. Why? Even though you’ll pay more tax this year, you’ll preserve larger depreciation deductions on the property for future years, when they may be more powerful — deductions save more tax when you’re paying a higher tax rate.

What to do on your 2017 return
The greater tax-saving power of deductions when rates are higher is why 2017 may be a particularly good year to take bonus depreciation. As you’re probably aware, the TCJA permanently replaces the graduated corporate tax rates of 15% to 35% with a flat corporate rate of 21% beginning with the 2018 tax year. It also reduces most individual rates, which benefits owners of pass-through entities such as S corporations, partnerships and, typically, limited liability companies, for tax years beginning in 2018 through 2025.

If your rate will be lower in 2018, there’s a greater likelihood that taking bonus depreciation for 2017 would save you more tax than taking all of your deduction under normal depreciation schedules over a period of years, especially if the asset meets the deadlines for 100% bonus depreciation.
If you’re unsure whether you should take bonus depreciation on your 2017 return — or you have questions about other depreciation-related breaks, such as Sec. 179 expensing — Call me at (856) 665-2121 or Text me at (856) 745-4330. Read More...

Meals, entertainment and transportation may cost businesses more under the TCJA

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 16:33:00 +0000

Meals, entertainment and transportation may cost businesses more under the TCJA

Along with tax rate reductions and a new deduction for pass-through qualified business income, the new tax law brings the reduction or elimination of tax deductions for certain business expenses. Two expense areas where the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) changes the rules — and not to businesses’ benefit — are meals/entertainment and transportation. In effect, the reduced tax benefits will mean these expenses are more costly to a business’s bottom line.

Meals and entertainment
Prior to the TCJA, taxpayers generally could deduct 50% of expenses for business-related meals and entertainment. Meals provided to an employee for the convenience of the employer on the employer’s business premises were 100% deductible by the employer and tax-free to the recipient employee.
Under the new law, for amounts paid or incurred after December 31, 2017, deductions for business-related entertainment expenses are disallowed.

Meal expenses incurred while traveling on business are still 50% deductible, but the 50% limit now also applies to meals provided via an on-premises cafeteria or otherwise on the employer’s premises for the convenience of the employer. After 2025, the cost of meals provided through an on-premises cafeteria or otherwise on the employer’s premises will no longer be deductible.

The TCJA disallows employer deductions for the cost of providing commuting transportation to an employee (such as hiring a car service), unless the transportation is necessary for the employee’s safety.

The new law also eliminates employer deductions for the cost of providing qualified employee transportation fringe benefits. Examples include parking allowances, mass transit passes and van pooling. These benefits are, however, still tax-free to recipient employees.

Transportation expenses for employee work-related travel away from home are still deductible (and tax-free to the employee), as long as they otherwise qualify for such tax treatment. (Note that, for 2018 through 2025, employees can’t deduct unreimbursed employee business expenses, such as travel expenses, as a miscellaneous itemized deduction.)

Assessing the impact
The TCJA’s changes to deductions for meals, entertainment and transportation expenses may affect your business’s budget. Depending on how much you typically spend on such expenses, you may want to consider changing some of your policies and/or benefits offerings in these areas. I would be pleased to help you assess the impact on your business. Call me at (856) 665-2121, Read More...

January 29, 2018 is the First Day for Filing 2017 1040's

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 19:57:00 +0000

Interesting Items for Recent Tax Reform and Cases

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:16:00 +0000

Client Letter concerning the Latest Tax Reforms and Developments to Individuals

The following is a summary of important tax developments that have occurred in the past three months that may affect you, your family, your investments, and your livelihood. Please call me at 856-665-2121 for more information about any of these developments and what steps you should implement to take advantage of favorable developments and to minimize the impact of those that are unfavorable.

Major Tax Reform. On December 22, President Trump signed into law the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" (P.L. 115-97), a sweeping tax reform law that will entirely change the tax landscape. Even though this is being referred to by politicians, the news media, and so-called opinion leaders as tax reform is really not reform. It is change. It is not a simplification of our tax system and in fact make some things more complex. Even though this will have a dramatic impact on most taxpayers, it is not the comprehensive tax reform of the Reagan administration in 1986.

Changes for Individuals. This comprehensive tax overhaul dramatically changes the rules governing the taxation of individual taxpayers for tax years beginning before 2026, providing new income tax rates and brackets, increasing the standard deduction, suspending personal deductions, increasing the child tax credit, limiting the state and local tax deduction, and temporarily reducing the medical expense threshold, among many other changes. The legislation also provides a new deduction for non-corporate taxpayers with qualified business income from pass-throughs. The interesting thing about this new legislation is that the large increase in standard deduction ($24,000 for married couples) means that many fewer people will be itemizing deductions. This will make their tax returns easier but will also hurt people in high tax states such as New Jersey because of the excessive state and local taxes.

Business Changes. For businesses, the legislation permanently reduces the corporate tax rate to 21%, repeals the corporate alternative minimum tax, imposes new limits on business interest deductions, and makes a number of changes involving expensing and depreciation. The legislation also makes significant changes to the tax treatment of foreign income and taxpayers, including the exemption from U.S. tax for certain foreign income and the deemed repatriation of off-shore income. This is already having an effect on major corporations because they are repatriating foreign profits. For example, Apple is repatriating so much money that they will owe close to $38 billion in federal corporate tax.

Regulations issued for electing out of new partnership audit rules. The IRS has issued final regulations on the election out of the centralized partnership audit regime rules, which are generally effective for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017. Under the new audit regime, any adjustment to items of income, gain, loss, deduction, or credit of a partnership for a partnership tax year (and any partner's distributive share thereof) generally is determined, and any tax attributable thereto is assessed and collected, at the partnership level. The applicability of any penalty, addition to tax, or additional amount which relates to an adjustment to any such item or share is also be determined at the partnership level. However, new regulations provide guidance on how eligible partnerships that are required to furnish 100 or fewer Schedules K-1 (Partner's Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc.) may elect out of this new regime.

Safe harbor methods for nonbusiness casualty losses. The IRS provided safe harbor methods that individual taxpayers may use in determining the amount of their casualty and theft losses for their personal-use residential real property and personal belongings. Taxpayers often have difficulty determining the amount of their losses under the IRS regulations. In order to provide certainty to both taxpayers and the IRS, the safe harbor methods provide easier ways for individuals to measure the decrease in the fair market value of their personal-use residential real property following a casualty and to determine the pre-casualty or theft fair market value of personal belongings. In addition, the IRS provided a safe harbor under which individuals may use one or more cost indexes to determine the amount of loss to their homes as a result of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey, Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria.

Deductions denied for house rented to daughter. The Ninth Circuit determined that married taxpayers weren't entitled to claim business deductions with regard to their second house that they rented to their daughter at below-market rates. During 2008 through 2010, the taxpayers reported rental income from daughter ($24,000 for 2008, $24,000 for 2009, and $6,000 for the first three months of 2010) and claimed deductions relating to the property for, among other things, mortgage interest, taxes, insurance, and depreciation. Overall, they claimed net losses for each year of $134,360, $84,600, and $107,820. The Court determined that the daughter's use of the house was, in effect, personal use by her parents for purposes of Code Sec. 280A(d)(1)'s limit on deductions with respect to a dwelling unit used for personal purposes. Because she didn't pay fair market rent, they didn't qualify for an exception to the general rule in Code Sec. 280A(e) disallowing deductions in excess of rental income. This is an important lesson for parents and family members. If you are going to rent a personal residence to a child or other family member, it is important that you have records showing that the rent is based upon fair market value. Remember, fair market value can have a wide range but it might be very helpful to have an appraisal or comparative market analysis from a realtor at the time of the rental to show that it is in the range of fair market rent. There should also be a written lease requiring the tenant to do certain actions, such as landscaping snow removal, repairs, painting, and upkeep and giving them a discount in the rent because of that. That will also help in an argument as to the fair market rent.

Standard mileage rates increase for 2018. The optional mileage allowance for owned or leased autos (including vans, pickups or panel trucks) increased by 1¢ to 54.5¢ per mile for business travel after 2017. This rate can also be used by employers to provide tax-free reimbursements to employees who supply their own autos for business use, under an accountable plan, and to value personal use of certain low-cost employer-provided vehicles. The rate for using a car to get medical care increased by 1¢ to 18¢ per mile.

Damage to home's concrete foundation was deductible casualty. The IRS provided a safe harbor that treats certain damage resulting from deteriorating concrete foundations as a casualty loss, effective for federal income tax returns (including amended federal income tax returns) filed after Nov. 21, 2017. The safe harbor applies to any individual taxpayers who pay to repair damage to their personal residence caused by a deteriorating concrete foundation that contains the mineral pyrrhotite. The safe harbor is available if the taxpayer has obtained a written evaluation from a licensed engineer indicating that the foundation was made with defective concrete containing the mineral pyrrhotite.

Please note: For tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017 and before Jan. 1, 2026, the personal casualty and theft loss deduction is suspended, except for personal casualty losses incurred in a Federally-declared disaster. (Code Sec. 165(h)(5), as amended by Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Sec. 11044).  That means, if the loss occurred in 2018 there would be no casualty deduction!

Cents-per-mile & fleet average FMV maximums. Thomson Reuters, a major tax research publishing company that I use, projected the 2018 inflation-adjusted maximum fair market values (FMVs) for employer-provided autos, trucks and vans, the personal use of which can be valued for fringe benefit purposes at the mileage allowance rate (54.5¢ per mile for 2018). For 2018, the FMV can't exceed $15,600 ($15,900 in 2017) and $17,600 ($17,800 in 2017) for trucks and vans—i.e., passenger autos built on a truck chassis, including minivans and sport-utility vehicles (SUVs) built on a truck chassis. In addition, the 2018 maximum fleet-average vehicle FMVs for autos, trucks and vans for purposes of the use of the annual lease value fringe benefit valuation method for an employer with a fleet of 20 or more vehicles are $20,600 for a passenger auto ($21,100 in 2017), or $23,100 for a truck or van ($23,300 in 2017).

Taxpayer was liable for million dollar FBAR penalty. The Ninth Circuit found that a taxpayer wilfully failed to file a Report of Foreign Bank and Foreign Accounts (FBAR) where IRS assessed a penalty of approximately $1.2 million penalty against the taxpayer for failing to disclose her financial interests in an overseas account. The Court rejected a variety of the taxpayer's arguments, ranging from the contention that the imposition of the penalty violated the U.S. Constitution's excessive fines, due process, and ex post facto clauses, to assertions that it was barred by statute of limitations or treaty provisions. The key take away from this case is that US citizens and residents must file these information reports showing foreign accounts. This is a big push by the IRS to. in essence, confiscate funds from people with overseas accounts. Read More...

Your 2017 tax return may be your last chance to take the “manufacturers’ deduction”

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 18:43:00 +0000

Your 2017 tax return may be your last chance to take the “manufacturers’ deduction”

While many provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) will save businesses tax, the new law also reduces or eliminates some tax breaks for businesses. One break it eliminates is the Section 199 deduction, commonly referred to as the “manufacturers’ deduction.” When it’s available, this potentially valuable tax break can be claimed by many types of businesses beyond just manufacturing companies. Under the TCJA, 2017 is the last tax year noncorporate taxpayers can take the deduction (2018 for C corporation taxpayers).

The basics
The Sec. 199 deduction, also called the “domestic production activities deduction,” is 9% of the lesser of qualified production activities income or taxable income. The deduction is also limited to 50% of W-2 wages paid by the taxpayer that are allocable to domestic production gross receipts (DPGR).

Yes, the deduction is available to traditional manufacturers. But businesses engaged in activities such as construction, engineering, architecture, computer software production and agricultural processing also may be eligible.

The deduction isn’t allowed in determining net self-employment earnings and generally can’t reduce net income below zero. But it can be used against the alternative minimum tax.
Calculating DPGR
To determine a company’s Sec. 199 deduction, its qualified production activities income must be calculated. This is the amount of DPGR exceeding the cost of goods sold and other expenses allocable to that DPGR. Most companies will need to allocate receipts between those that qualify as DPGR and those that don’t • unless less than 5% of receipts aren’t attributable to DPGR.
DPGR can come from a number of activities, including the construction of real property in the United States, as well as engineering or architectural services performed stateside to construct real property. It also can result from the lease, rental, licensing or sale of qualifying production property, such as tangible personal property (for example, machinery and office equipment), computer software, and master copies of sound recordings.
The property must have been manufactured, produced, grown or extracted in whole or “significantly” within the United States. While each situation is assessed on its merits, the IRS has said that, if the labor and overhead incurred in the United States accounted for at least 20% of the total cost of goods sold, the activity typically qualifies.
Learn more
Contact us to learn whether this potentially powerful deduction could reduce your business’s tax liability when you file your 2017 return. We can also help address any questions you may have about other business tax breaks that have been reduced or eliminated by the TCJA. Read More...

Bid to collect internet sales tax gets U.S. Supreme Court review | Tax Pro Today

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 23:36:00 +0000
Bid to collect internet sales tax gets U.S. Supreme Court review | Tax Pro Today

It is easy to go after US-based businesses, even the small companies that remain in business trying to comply with the 8,000 different Sales Tax collection rates and jurisdictions. So, yes, the States will collect some money from Large US businesses and drive small internet companies bankrupt. But how will they collect from the Chinese sellers? Or, some of the sellers from a myriad of countries. Let's face it, this will be a disaster for US consumers giving us less choice, higher prices, and will force many good internet businesses to close.

Way to go!

New tax law gives pass-through businesses a valuable deduction

Mon, 08 Jan 2018 16:00:00 +0000

New tax law gives pass-through businesses a valuable deduction

Although the drop of the corporate tax rate from a top rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21% may be one of the most talked about provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), C corporations aren’t the only type of entity significantly benefiting from the new law. Owners of noncorporate “pass-through” entities may see some major — albeit temporary — relief in the form of a new deduction for a portion of qualified business income (QBI).

A 20% deduction
For tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026, the new deduction is available to individuals, estates and trusts that own interests in pass-through business entities. Such entities include sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations and, typically, limited liability companies (LLCs). The deduction generally equals 20% of QBI, subject to restrictions that can apply if taxable income exceeds the applicable threshold — $157,500 or, if married filing jointly, $315,000.
QBI is generally defined as the net amount of qualified items of income, gain, deduction and loss from any qualified business of the noncorporate owner. For this purpose, qualified items are income, gain, deduction and loss that are effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. business. QBI doesn’t include certain investment items, reasonable compensation paid to an owner for services rendered to the business or any guaranteed payments to a partner or LLC member treated as a partner for services rendered to the partnership or LLC.

The QBI deduction isn’t allowed in calculating the owner’s adjusted gross income (AGI), but it reduces taxable income. In effect, it’s treated the same as an allowable itemized deduction.

The limitations
For pass-through entities other than sole proprietorships, the QBI deduction generally can’t exceed the greater of the owner’s share of:
  • 50% of the amount of W-2 wages paid to employees by the qualified business during the tax year, or
  • The sum of 25% of W-2 wages plus 2.5% of the cost of qualified property.
Qualified property is the depreciable tangible property (including real estate) owned by a qualified business as of year-end and used by the business at any point during the tax year for the production of qualified business income.

Another restriction is that the QBI deduction generally isn’t available for income from specified service businesses. Examples include businesses that involve investment-type services and most professional practices (other than engineering and architecture).

The W-2 wage limitation and the service business limitation don’t apply as long as your taxable income is under the applicable threshold. In that case, you should qualify for the full 20% QBI deduction.

Careful planning required
Additional rules and limits apply to the QBI deduction, and careful planning will be necessary to gain maximum benefit. Please contact me at (856) 665-2121 for more details Read More...

Bonus Depreciation under the new Tax Law can affect 2017 return

Tue, 02 Jan 2018 16:16:00 +0000

The TCJA temporarily expands bonus depreciation

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enhances some tax breaks for businesses while reducing or eliminating others. One break it enhances — temporarily — is bonus depreciation. While most TCJA provisions go into effect for the 2018 tax year, you might be able to benefit from the bonus depreciation enhancements when you file your 2017 tax return.

Pre-TCJA bonus depreciation
Under pre-TCJA law, for qualified new assets that your business placed in service in 2017, you can claim a 50% first-year bonus depreciation deduction. Used assets don’t qualify. This tax break is available for the cost of new computer systems, purchased software, vehicles, machinery, equipment, office furniture, etc.

In addition, 50% bonus depreciation can be claimed for qualified improvement property, which means any qualified improvement to the interior portion of a nonresidential building if the improvement is placed in service after the date the building is placed in service. But qualified improvement costs don’t include expenditures for the enlargement of a building, an elevator or escalator, or the internal structural framework of a building.

TCJA expansion
The TCJA significantly expands bonus depreciation: For qualified property placed in service between September 28, 2017, and December 31, 2022 (or by December 31, 2023, for certain property with longer production periods), the first-year bonus depreciation percentage increases to 100%. In addition, the 100% deduction is allowed for not just new but also used qualifying property.
The new law also allows 100% bonus depreciation for qualified film, television and live theatrical productions placed in service on or after September 28, 2017. Productions are considered placed in service at the time of the initial release, broadcast or live commercial performance.

Beginning in 2023, bonus depreciation is scheduled to be reduced 20 percentage points each year. So, for example, it would be 80% for property placed in service in 2023, 60% in 2024, etc., until it would be fully eliminated in 2027.For certain property with longer production periods, the reductions are delayed by one year. For example, 80% bonus depreciation would apply to long-production-period property placed in service in 2024.

Bonus depreciation is only one of the business tax breaks that have changed under the TCJA. Contact me at (856) 665-2121 for more information on this and other changes that will impact your business. Read More...

Business Tax Law Changes - letter to Clients

Wed, 27 Dec 2017 20:12:00 +0000
Business Tax Law Changes

The following is my client letter addressing the Business Tax Law Changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017:

On December 22, the President signed into law the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA). The 503-page TCJA is the largest tax overhaul since the 1986 Tax Reform Act and it will affect almost every individual and business in the United States. Unlike the provisions for individuals, which generally expire after 2025, the business-related provisions in the TCJA are permanent and generally take effect in tax years beginning after 2017.

For businesses, highlights of the TCJA include: (1) an increase in amounts that may be expensed under bonus depreciation and Section 179; (2) a 21 percent flat corporate tax rate; (3) a new business deduction for sole proprietorships and pass-through entities; and (4) the elimination of the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT).

Overview of TCJA Changes Affecting Businesses

The following is a summary of some of the more significant changes under the new tax law that may affect your business.

Reduction in Corporate Tax Rate and Dividends Received Deduction

TCJA eliminates the graduated corporate tax rate structure and instead taxes corporate taxable income at 21 percent. It also eliminates the special tax rate for personal service corporations and repeals the maximum corporate tax rate on net capital gain as obsolete.

A corresponding change reduces the 70 percent dividends received deduction available to corporations that receive a dividend from another taxable domestic corporation to 50 percent, and the 80 percent dividends received deduction for dividends received from a 20 percent owned corporation to 65 percent.

Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) Eliminated

TCJA repeals the corporate AMT. It also allows the AMT credit to offset the regular tax liability for any taxable year. In addition, the AMT credit is refundable for any taxable year beginning after 2017 and before 2022 in an amount equal to 50 percent (100 percent in the case of taxable years beginning in 2021) of the excess of the minimum tax credit for the taxable year over the amount of the credit allowable for the year against regular tax liability.

Enhanced Bonus Depreciation Deduction

TCJA extends and modifies the additional first-year (i.e., "bonus") depreciation deduction, which had generally been scheduled to end in 2019, through 2026 (through 2027 for longer production period property and certain aircraft). Under the new law, the 50-percent additional depreciation allowance is increased to 100 percent for property placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023 (January 1, 2024, for longer production period property and certain aircraft), as well as for specified plants planted or grafted after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023.

The 100-percent allowance is phased down by 20 percent per calendar year for property placed in service, and specified plants planted or grafted, in taxable years beginning after 2022 (after 2023 for longer production period property and certain aircraft).

TCJA also maintains the bonus depreciation increase amount of $8,000 for luxury passenger automobiles placed in service after December 31, 2017, that had been scheduled to be phased down in 2018 and 2019.

TCJA also removes the requirement that, in order to qualify for bonus depreciation, the original use of qualified property must begin with the taxpayer. Thus, the provision applies to purchases of used as well as new items.

TCJA also expands the definition of qualified property eligible for the additional first-year depreciation allowance to include qualified film, television and live theatrical productions, effective for productions placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023.

Enhanced Section 179 Expensing

TCJA increases the maximum amount a taxpayer may expense under Code Sec. 179 to $1,000,000, and increases the phase-out threshold amount to $2,500,000. Thus, the maximum amount you may expense, for taxable years beginning after 2017, is $1,000,000 of the cost of qualifying property you place in service during the tax year. The $1,000,000 amount is reduced (but not below zero) by the amount by which the cost of qualifying property placed in service during the taxable year exceeds $2,500,000.

In addition, TCJA expands the definition of Code Sec. 179 property to include certain depreciable tangible personal property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with furnishing lodging.

TCJA also expands the definition of qualified real property eligible for Code Sec. 179 expensing to include any of the following improvements to nonresidential real property placed in service after the date such property was first placed in service: roofs; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning property; fire protection and alarm systems; and security systems.

Modifications to Depreciation Limitations on Luxury Automobiles and Personal Use Property

TCJA increases the depreciation limitations that apply to listed property, such as luxury automobiles. For passenger automobiles that qualify as luxury automobiles (i.e., gross unloaded weight of 6,000 lbs or more) placed in service after December 31, 2017, and for which the additional first-year depreciation deduction is not claimed, the maximum amount of allowable depreciation is $10,000 for the year in which the vehicle is placed in service, $16,000 for the second year, $9,600 for the third year, and $5,760 for the fourth and later years in the recovery period. The limitations are indexed for inflation for luxury passenger automobiles placed in service after 2018.

In addition, TCJA removes computer or peripheral equipment from the definition of listed property. Such property is therefore not subject to the heightened substantiation requirements that apply to listed property.

Modification of Like-Kind Exchange Rules

TCJA modifies the rule for like-kind exchanges by limiting its application to real property that is not held primarily for sale. While the provision generally applies to exchanges completed after December 31, 2017, an exception is provided for any exchange if the property disposed of by the taxpayer in the exchange is disposed of on or before December 31, 2017, or the property received by the taxpayer in the exchange is received on or before such date.

Other Changes Relating to Cost Recovery and Property Transactions

TCJA makes the following additional changes with respect to cost recovery and property transactions:

(1) allows for expensing of certain costs of replanting citrus plants lost by reason of casualty;

(2) shortens the alternative depreciation system (ADS) recovery period for residential rental property from 40 to 30 years;

(3) allows an electing real property trade or business to use the ADS recovery period in depreciating real and qualified improvement property;

(4) shortens the recovery period from 7 to 5 years for certain machinery or equipment used in a farming business;

(5) repeals the required use of the 150-percent declining balance method for depreciating property used in a farming business (i.e., for 3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-year property);

(6) excludes various types of self-created property from the definition of a "capital asset", including: patents, inventions, models or designs (whether or not patented), and secret formula and processes;

(7) specifies situations in which a contribution to the capital of a corporation is includable in the gross income of a corporation (i.e., contributions by a customer or potential customer, and contributions by governmental entities and civic groups); and

(8) tweaks the carried interest rule to provide that a profits interest must be held for three years, rather than one year, in order to receive favorable long-term capital gain treatment.

Repeal of Domestic Activities Production Deduction

TCJA repeals the deduction for domestic production activities. Note: this is quite interesting since the DAPD is a good tax incentive for creating US high-end jobs. Probably, this was just a revenue-raiser.

New Deduction for Qualified Business Income

If you are a sole proprietor, a partner in a partnership, a member in an LLC taxed as a partnership (hereafter, "partner"), or a shareholder in an S corporation, TCJA provides a new deduction for qualified business income for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026. Trusts and estates are also eligible for this deduction.

The amount of the deduction is generally 20 percent of the taxpayer's qualifying business income from a qualified trade or business.

Example: In 2018, Joe receives $100,000 in salary from his job at XYZ Corporation and $50,000 of qualified business income from a side business that he runs as a sole proprietorship. Joe's deduction for qualified business income in 2018 is $10,000 (20 percent x $50,000).

The deduction for qualified business income is claimed by individual taxpayers on their personal tax returns. The deduction reduces taxable income. The deduction is not used in computing adjusted gross income. Thus, it does not affect limitations based on adjusted gross income.

The deduction is subject to several restrictions and limitations, discussed below.

Qualified Trade or Business. A qualified trade or business means any trade or business other than (1) a specified service trade or business, or (2) the trade or business of being an employee. A "specified service trade or business" is defined as any trade or business involving the performance of services in the fields of health, law, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, athletics, financial services, brokerage services, including investing and investment management, trading, or dealing in securities, partnership interests, or commodities, and any trade or business where the principal asset of such trade or business is the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees. Engineering and architecture services are specifically excluded from the definition of a specified service trade or business.

Special Rule Where Taxpayer's Income is Below a Specified Threshold. The rule disqualifying specified service trades or businesses from being considered a qualified trade or business does not apply to individuals with taxable income of less than $157,500 ($315,000 for joint filers). After an individual reaches the threshold amount, the restriction is phased in over a range of $50,000 in taxable income ($100,000 for joint filers). If an individual's income falls within the range, he or she is allowed a partial deduction. Once the end of the range is reached, the deduction is completely disallowed.

"Domestic" Business Income Requirement. Items are treated as qualified items of income, gain, deduction, and loss only to the extent they are effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States.

Qualified Business Income. Qualified business income means the net amount of qualified items of income, gain, deduction, and loss with respect to the qualified trade or business of the taxpayer. Qualified business income does not include any amount paid by an S corporation that is treated as reasonable compensation of the taxpayer, or any guaranteed payment (or other payment) to a partner for services rendered with respect to the trade or business. Qualified items do not include specified investment-related income, deductions, or losses, such as capital gains and losses, dividends and dividend equivalents, interest income other than that which is properly allocable to a trade or business, and similar items.

Loss Carryovers. If the net amount of qualified business income from all qualified trades or businesses during the tax year is a loss, it is carried forward as a loss from a qualified trade or business in the next tax year (and reduces the qualified business income for that year).

W-2 Wage Limitation. The deductible amount for each qualified trade or business is the lesser of:

(1) 20 percent of the taxpayer's qualified business income with respect to the trade or business; or

(2) the greater of: (a) 50 percent of the W-2 wages with respect to the trade or business, or (b) the sum of 25 percent of the W-2 wages with respect to the trade or business and 2.5 percent of the unadjusted basis, immediately after acquisition, of all qualified property (generally all depreciable property still within its depreciable period at the end of the tax year).

Example: Susan owns and operates a sole proprietorship that sells cupcakes. The cupcake business pays $100,000 in W-2 wages and has $350,000 in qualified business income. For the sake of simplicity, assume the business had no qualified property and that the variation of the limitation involving the unadjusted basis of such property isn't relevant. Susan's deduction for qualified business income is $50,000, which is the lesser of (a) 20 percent of $350,000 in qualified business income ($70,000), or (b) the 50 percent of W-2 wages ($50,000).

The W-2 wage limitation does not apply to individuals with taxable income of less than $157,500 ($315,000 for joint filers). After an individual reaches the threshold amount, the W-2 limitation is phased in over a range of $50,000 in taxable income ($100,000 for joint filers).

Allocation of Partnership and S Corporations Items. In the case of a partnership or S corporation, the business income deduction applies at the partner or shareholder level. Each partner in a partnership takes into account the partner's allocable share of each qualified item of income, gain, deduction, and loss, and is treated as having W-2 wages for the taxable year equal to the partner's allocable share of W-2 wages of the partnership. Similarly, each shareholder in an S corporation takes into account the shareholder's pro rata share of each qualified item and W-2 wages.

Additional Limitations on the Deduction for Qualified Business Income. This deduction for qualified business income is subject to some overriding limitations relating to taxable income, net capital gains, and other items which are beyond the scope of this letter and will not affect the amount of the deduction in most situations.

Carryover of Business Losses

TCJA provides that, for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026, excess business losses of a taxpayer other than a corporation are not allowed for the taxable year. Instead, if you incur such losses, you must carry them forward and treat them as part of your net operating loss (NOL) carryforward in subsequent taxable years. Thus, TCJA generally repeals the two-year carryback and the special carryback provisions under prior law; however, it does provide a two-year carryback in the case of certain losses incurred in the trade or business of farming. NOL carryovers generally are allowed for a taxable year up to the lesser of your carryover amount or 80 percent of your taxable income determined without regard to the deduction for NOLs.

Relaxed Gross Receipts Test for Various Accounting Methods

TCJA expands the universe of taxpayers who can use various accounting methods by increasing the gross receipts threshold ("gross receipts test") under which those methods may be used. TCJA increases the limit for the gross receipts test to $25 million for using the cash method of accounting (including the use by farming C corporations and farming partnerships with a C corporation partner).

The new law also increases the limit for the gross receipts test to $25 million for exemption from the following accounting requirements/methods:

(1) uniform capitalization rules;

(2) the requirement to keep inventories (allowing taxpayers to treat inventories as non-incidental materials and supplies, or in another manner conforming with the taxpayer's financial accounting treatment of inventories); and

(3) the requirement to use the percentage-of-completion method for certain long-term contracts (allowing the use of the more favorable completed-contract method, or any other permissible exempt contract method).

Additional requirements and restrictions apply to the use of the above-mentioned accounting methods. For most, only the dollar limit for the gross receipts test has been relaxed.

Accounting Method Rules Relating to Income Recognition Modified

TCJA revises the rules associated with the recognition of income. Specifically, the new law requires a taxpayer subject to the all events test for an item of gross income to recognize such income no later than the taxable year in which such income is taken into account as income on an applicable financial statement or another financial statement under rules specified by the Secretary, but provides an exception for long-term contract income to which Code Sec. 460 applies.

TCJA also codifies the current deferral method of accounting for advance payments for goods and services provided by the IRS under Rev. Proc. 2004-34. That is, the law allows taxpayers to defer the inclusion of income associated with certain advance payments to the end of the tax year following the tax year of receipt if such income also is deferred for financial statement purposes.

Interest Deduction Rules Changed for Certain Taxpayers

Under TCJA, a taxpayer's deduction for business interest is limited to the sum of business interest income plus 30 percent of adjusted taxable income for the taxable year. There is an exception to this limitation, however, for certain small taxpayers, certain real estate businesses that make an election to be exempt from this rule, and businesses with floor plan financing, which is a specialized type of financing used by car dealerships, and for certain regulated utilities.

For smaller taxpayers, TCJA exempts from the interest limitation taxpayers with average annual gross receipts for the three-taxable year period ending with the prior taxable year that do not exceed $25 million. Further, at the taxpayer's election, any real property development, redevelopment, construction, reconstruction, acquisition, conversion, rental, operation, management, leasing, or brokerage trade or business is not treated as a trade or business for purposes of the limitation, and therefore the limitation does not apply to such trades or businesses.

Limitation on Deduction by Employers of Expenses for Fringe Benefits

TCJA provides that no deduction is allowed with respect to:

(1) an activity generally considered to be entertainment, amusement or recreation;

(2) membership dues with respect to any club organized for business, pleasure, recreation or other social purposes; or

(3) a facility or portion thereof used in connection with any of the above items.

Thus, the present-law exception to the deduction disallowance for entertainment, amusement, or recreation that is directly related to (or, in certain cases, associated with) the active conduct of the taxpayer's trade or business (and the related rule applying a 50 percent limit to such deductions) is repealed.

TCJA also disallows a deduction for expenses associated with providing any qualified transportation fringe to employees of the taxpayer, and except as necessary for ensuring the safety of an employee, any expense incurred for providing transportation (or any payment or reimbursement) for commuting between the employee's residence and place of employment.

A business may still generally deduct 50 percent of the food and beverage expenses associated with operating their trade or business (e.g., meals consumed by employees during work travel). For amounts incurred and paid after December 31, 2017, and until December 31, 2025, this 50 percent limitation is expanded to expenses of the employer associated with providing food and beverages to employees through an eating facility that meets requirements for de minimis fringes and for the convenience of the employer. Such amounts incurred and paid after December 31, 2025 are not deductible.

Employer Credit for Paid Family and Medical Leave

For 2018 and 2019, TCJA allows eligible employers to claim a general business credit equal to 12.5 percent of the amount of wages paid to qualifying employees during any period in which such employees are on family and medical leave if the rate of payment under the program is 50 percent of the wages normally paid to an employee. The credit is increased by 0.25 percentage points (but not above 25 percent) for each percentage point by which the rate of payment exceeds 50 percent.

Observation: An employer must have a written policy in place that provides family and medical leave to all employees on a non-discriminatory basis in order to qualify for the credit. Given the cost of implementing such a policy and complying with yet-to-be-announced reporting requirements, the credit may be impractical for many employers to pursue during the short period it's available. For companies that already have a qualifying family and medical leave plan in place, however, the credit may provide a nice windfall.

Partnership Rule Changes

Several changes were made to the partnership tax rules.

First, gain or loss from the sale or exchange of a partnership interest is treated as effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business to the extent that the transferor would have had effectively connected gain or loss had the partnership sold all of its assets at fair market value as of the date of the sale or exchange. Any gain or loss from the hypothetical asset sale by the partnership is allocated to interests in the partnership in the same manner as nonseparately stated income and loss.

Second, the transferee of a partnership interest must withhold 10 percent of the amount realized on the sale or exchange of the partnership interest unless the transferor certifies that the transferor is not a nonresident alien individual or foreign corporation.

Third, TCJA modifies the definition of a substantial built-in loss such that a substantial built-in loss is considered to exist if the transferee of a partnership interest would be allocated a net loss in excess of $250,000 upon a hypothetical disposition by the partnership of all partnership's assets in a fully taxable transaction for cash equal to the assets' fair market value, immediately after the transfer of the partnership interest.

Fourth, TCJA modifies the basis limitation on partner losses to provide that a partner's distributive share of items that are not deductible in computing the partnership's taxable income, and not properly chargeable to capital account, are allowed only to the extent of the partner's adjusted basis in its partnership interest at the end of the partnership taxable year in which an expenditure occurs. Thus, the basis limitation on partner losses applies to a partner's distributive share of charitable contributions and foreign taxes. Lastly, TCJA repeals the rule providing for technical terminations of partnerships. Under that rule, a partnership's existence did not necessarily end; rather, it resulted in the termination of some tax attributes and the possibly early closing of the tax year.

S Corporation Changes

TCJA makes several changes to the tax rules involving S corporations. First, it provides that income that must be taken into account when an S corporation revokes its election is taken into account ratably over six years, rather than the four years under prior law. Second, it allows a nonresident alien individual to be a potential current beneficiary of an electing small business trust (ESBT). Third, it provides that the charitable contribution deduction of an ESBT is not determined by the rules generally applicable to trusts but rather by the rules applicable to individuals. Thus, the percentage limitations and carryforward provisions applicable to individuals apply to charitable contributions made by the portion of an ESBT holding S corporation stock.

International Tax Changes

TCJA makes sweeping changes to the United States' international tax regime through a series of highly complex provisions that are beyond the scope of this letter.


Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Key provisions a ffecting Businesses

Tue, 26 Dec 2017 15:51:00 +0000

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Key provisions affecting businesses

The recently passed tax reform bill, commonly referred to as the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (TCJA), is the most expansive federal tax legislation since 1986. It includes a multitude of provisions that will have a major impact on businesses.
Here’s a look at some of the most significant changes. They generally apply to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, except where noted.
  • Replacement of graduated corporate tax rates ranging from 15% to 35% with a flat corporate rate of 21%
  • Repeal of the 20% corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT)
  • New 20% qualified business income deduction for owners of flow-through entities (such as partnerships, limited liability companies and S corporations) and sole proprietorships — through 2025
  • Doubling of bonus depreciation to 100% and expansion of qualified assets to include used assets — effective for assets acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023
  • Doubling of the Section 179 expensing limit to $1 million and an increase of the expensing phaseout threshold to $2.5 million
  • Other enhancements to depreciation-related deductions
  • New disallowance of deductions for net interest expense in excess of 30% of the business’s adjusted taxable income (exceptions apply)
  • New limits on net operating loss (NOL) deductions
  • Elimination of the Section 199 deduction, also commonly referred to as the domestic production activities deduction or manufacturers’ deduction — effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, for noncorporate taxpayers and for tax years beginning after December 31, 2018, for C corporation taxpayers
  • New rule limiting like-kind exchanges to real property that is not held primarily for sale
  • New tax credit for employer-paid family and medical leave — through 2019
  • New limitations on excessive employee compensation
  • New limitations on deductions for employee fringe benefits, such as entertainment and, in certain circumstances, meals and transportation
Keep in mind that additional rules and limits apply to what we’ve covered here, and there are other TCJA provisions that may affect your business. Contact me at (856) 665-2121 for more details and to discuss what your business needs to do in light of these changes. Read More...

Tax Reform Summary and action Plan for the last weeks of 2017

Wed, 20 Dec 2017 20:25:00 +0000
This is my client letter addressing Tax Reform:

Dear Client:

Congress is enacting the biggest tax reform law in thirty years, one that will make fundamental changes in the way you, your family and your business calculate your federal income tax bill, and the amount of federal tax you will pay. Since most of the changes will go into effect next year, there's still a narrow window of time before year-end to soften or avoid the impact of crackdowns and to best position yourself for the tax breaks that may be heading your way. Here's a quick rundown of last-minute moves you should think about making.
Lower tax rates coming. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will reduce tax rates for many taxpayers, effective for the 2018 tax year. Additionally, many businesses, including those operated as passthroughs, such as partnerships, may see their tax bills cut.
The general plan of action to take advantage of lower tax rates next year is to defer income into next year. Some possibilities follow:

  • If you are about to convert a regular IRA to a Roth IRA, postpone your move until next year. That way you'll defer income from the conversion until next year and have it taxed at lower rates.
  • Earlier this year, you may have already converted a regular IRA to a Roth IRA but now you question the wisdom of that move, as the tax on the conversion will be subject to a lower tax rate next year. You can unwind the conversion to the Roth IRA by doing a recharacterization—making a trustee-to-trustee transfer from the Roth to a regular IRA. This way, the original conversion to a Roth IRA will be cancelled out. But you must complete the recharacterization before year-end. Starting next year, you won't be able to use a recharacterization to unwind a regular-IRA-to-Roth-IRA conversion.
  • If you run a business that renders services and operates on the cash basis, the income you earn isn't taxed until your clients or patients pay. So if you hold off on billings until next year—or until so late in the year that no payment will likely be received this year—you will likely succeed in deferring income until next year.
  • If your business is on the accrual basis, deferral of income till next year is difficult but not impossible. For example, you might, with due regard to business considerations, be able to postpone completion of a last-minute job until 2018, or defer deliveries of merchandise until next year (if doing so won't upset your customers). Taking one or more of these steps would postpone your right to payment, and the income from the job or the merchandise, until next year. Keep in mind that the rules in this area are complex and may require a tax professional's input.
  • The reduction or cancellation of debt generally results in taxable income to the debtor. So if you are planning to make a deal with creditors involving debt reduction, consider postponing action until January to defer any debt cancellation income into 2018.
Disappearing or reduced deductions, larger standard deduction. Beginning next year, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act suspends or reduces many popular tax deductions in exchange for a larger standard deduction. Here's what you can do about this right now:

  • Individuals (as opposed to businesses) will only be able to claim an itemized deduction of up to $10,000 ($5,000 for a married taxpayer filing a separate return) for the total of

    1. State and local property taxes; and
    2. State and local income taxes.
    To avoid this limitation, pay the last installment of estimated state and local taxes for 2017 no later than Dec. 31, 2017, rather than on the 2018 due date. But don't prepay in 2017 a state income tax bill that will be imposed next year – Congress says such a prepayment won't be deductible in 2017. However, Congress only forbade prepayments for state income taxes, not property taxes, so a prepayment on or before Dec. 31, 2017, of a 2018 property tax installment is apparently OK.
  • The itemized deduction for charitable contributions won't be chopped. But because most other itemized deductions will be eliminated in exchange for a larger standard deduction (e.g., $24,000 for joint filers), charitable contributions after 2017 may not yield a tax benefit for many because they won't be able to itemize deductions. If you think you will fall in this category, consider accelerating some charitable giving into 2017.
  • The new law temporarily boosts itemized deductions for medical expenses. For 2017 and 2018 these expenses can be claimed as itemized deductions to the extent they exceed a floor equal to 7.5% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). Before the new law, the floor was 10% of AGI, except for 2017 it was 7.5% of AGI for age-65-or-older taxpayers. But keep in mind that next year many individuals will have to claim the standard deduction because many itemized deductions have been eliminated. If you won't be able to itemize deductions after this year, but will be able to do so this year, consider accelerating "discretionary" medical expenses into this year. For example, before the end of the year, get new glasses or contacts, or see if you can squeeze in expensive dental work such as an implant.
Other year-end strategies. Here are some other last minute moves that can save tax dollars in view of the new tax law:

  • The new law substantially increases the alternative minimum tax (AMT) exemption amount, beginning next year. There may be steps you can take now to take advantage of that increase. For example, the exercise of an incentive stock option (ISO) can result in AMT complications. So, if you hold any ISOs, it may be wise to postpone exercising them until next year. And, for various deductions, e.g., depreciation and the investment interest expense deduction, the deduction will be curtailed if you are subject to the AMT. If the higher 2018 AMT exemption means you won't be subject to the 2018 AMT, it may be worthwhile, via tax elections or postponed transactions, to push such deductions into 2018.
  • Like-kind exchanges are a popular way to avoid current tax on the appreciation of an asset, but after Dec. 31, 2017, such swaps will be possible only if they involve real estate that isn't held primarily for sale. So if you are considering a like-kind swap of other types of property, do so before year-end. The new law says the old, far more liberal like-kind exchange rules will continue apply to exchanges of personal property if you either dispose of the relinquished property or acquire the replacement property on or before Dec. 31, 2017.
  • For decades, businesses have been able to deduct 50% of the cost of entertainment directly related to or associated with the active conduct of a business. For example, if you take a client to a nightclub after a business meeting, you can deduct 50% of the cost if strict substantiation requirements are met. But under the new law, for amounts paid or incurred after Dec. 31, 2017, there's no deduction for such expenses. So if you've been thinking of entertaining clients and business associates, do so before year-end.
  • Under current rules, alimony payments generally are an above-the line deduction for the payor and included in the income of the payee. Under the new law, alimony payments aren't deductible by the payor or includible in the income of the payee, generally effective for any divorce decree or separation agreement executed after 2017. So if you're in the middle of a divorce or separation agreement, and you'll wind up on the paying end, it would be worth your while to wrap things up before year end. On the other hand, if you'll wind up on the receiving end, it would be worth your while to wrap things up next year.
  • The new law suspends the deduction for moving expenses after 2017 (except for certain members of the Armed Forces), and also suspends the tax-free reimbursement of employment-related moving expenses. So if you're in the midst of a job-related move, try to incur your deductible moving expenses before year-end, or if the move is connected with a new job and you're getting reimbursed by your new employer, press for a reimbursement to be made to you before year-end.
  • Under current law, various employee business expenses, e.g., employee home office expenses, are deductible as itemized deductions if those expenses plus certain other expenses exceed 2% of adjusted gross income. The new law suspends the deduction for employee business expenses paid after 2017. So, we should determine whether paying additional employee business expenses in 2017, that you would otherwise pay in 2018, would provide you with an additional 2017 tax benefit. Also, now would be a good time to talk to your employer about changing your compensation arrangement—for example, your employer reimbursing you for the types of employee business expenses that you have been paying yourself up to now, and lowering your salary by an amount that approximates those expenses. In most cases, such reimbursements would not be subject to tax.
Please keep in mind that I've described only some of the year-end moves that should be considered in light of the new tax law. If you would like more details about any aspect of how the new law may affect you, please do not hesitate to call me at (856) 665-2121.

Happy Holidays!

Ron Cappuccio

This year’s company holiday party is probably tax deductible, but next year’s may not be

Mon, 18 Dec 2017 19:43:00 +0000

This year’s company holiday party is probably tax deductible, but next year’s may not be

Many businesses are hosting holiday parties for employees this time of year. It’s a great way to reward your staff for their hard work and have a little fun. And you can probably deduct 100% of your 2017 party’s cost as a meal and entertainment (M&E) expense. Next year may be a different story.
The 100% deduction
For 2017, businesses generally are limited to deducting 50% of allowable meal and entertainment expenses. But certain expenses are 100% deductible, including expenses:
  • For recreational or social activities for employees, such as holiday parties and summer picnics,
  • For food and beverages furnished at the workplace primarily for employees, and
  • That are excludable from employees’ income as de minimis fringe benefits.
There is one caveat for a 100% deduction: The entire staff must be invited. Otherwise, expenses are deductible under the regular business entertainment rules.
Additional requirements
Whether you deduct 50% or 100% of allowable expenses, there are a number of requirements, including certain records you must keep to prove your expenses.
If your company has substantial meal and entertainment expenses, you can reduce your 2017 tax bill by separately accounting for and documenting expenses that are 100% deductible. If doing so would create an administrative burden, you may be able to use statistical sampling methods to estimate the portion of meal and entertainment expenses that are fully deductible.
Possible changes for 2018
It appears the M&E deduction for employee parties — along with deductions for many other M&E expenses — will be eliminated beginning in 2018 under the reconciled version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. For more information about deducting business meals and entertainment, including how to take advantage of the 100% deduction when you file your 2017 return, please contact me. Read More...

SHould you Buy a Business Vehicle THis Year?

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 14:30:00 +0000

Should you buy a business vehicle before year end?

One way to reduce your 2017 tax bill is to buy a business vehicle before year end. But don’t make a purchase without first looking at what your 2017 deduction would be and whether tax reform legislation could affect the tax benefit of a 2017 vs. 2018 purchase.

Your 2017 deduction
Business-related purchases of new or used vehicles may be eligible for Section 179 expensing, which allows you to immediately deduct, rather than depreciate over a period of years, some or all of the vehicle’s cost. But the size of your 2017 deduction will depend on several factors. One is the gross vehicle weight rating.

The normal Sec. 179 expensing limit generally applies to vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 14,000 pounds. The limit for 2017 is $510,000, and the break begins to phase out dollar-for-dollar when total asset acquisitions for the tax year exceed $2.03 million.
But a $25,000 limit applies to SUVs rated at more than 6,000 pounds but no more than 14,000 pounds. Vehicles rated at 6,000 pounds or less are subject to the passenger automobile limits. For 2017, under current law, the depreciation limit is $3,160. And the amount that may be deducted under the combination of Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) depreciation and Sec. 179 for the first year is limited under the luxury auto rules to $11,160.

In addition, if a vehicle is used for business and personal purposes, the associated expenses, including depreciation, must be allocated between deductible business use and nondeductible personal use. The depreciation limit is reduced if the business use is less than 100%. If the business use is 50% or less, you can’t use Sec. 179 expensing or the accelerated regular MACRS; you must use the straight-line method.

Factoring in tax reform
If tax reform legislation is signed into law and it will cause your marginal rate to go down in 2018, then purchasing a vehicle by December 31, 2017, could save you more tax than waiting until 2018. Why? Tax deductions are more powerful when rates are higher. But if your 2017 Sec. 179 expense deduction would be reduced or eliminated because of the asset acquisition phaseout, then you might be better off waiting until 2018 to buy.

Also be aware that tax reform legislation could affect the depreciation limits for passenger vehicles, even if purchased in 2017.

These are just a few factors to look at. Many additional rules and limits apply to these breaks. So if you’re considering a business vehicle purchase, contact me to discuss whether it would make more tax sense to buy this year or next.


New Email Scam

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 18:12:00 +0000
Here we go again:

Hi, how are you and your family? I have been in search for someone bearing this name in your country therefore when i saw your name, i am pleased to contact you and determine how best we can assist each other. I am working with a savings company here in Ipoh, Perak of Malaysia as the manager of the warehouse department. I believe it is in my destiny for me to have come across your name. I have a business i wish to share with you. I believe it will interest you, because it is in connection with your name and you will benefit from it.

A citizen of your country deposited a consignment of One Million, Seven Hundred and Fifty Thousand United States Dollars ($1,750,000.00), with the company i am working with in 2014 for 36 calendar months, and the due date for the deposit contract is 22nd of June 2017. Sadly, he died in a car accident in Japan. He was in Japan on a business trip where he met his end. The company headquarters’ boss does not know about his death. I knew about it because he was my friend and i was the officer in charge of his consignment at the time he made the deposit. He did not mention a beneficiary. He was not married and had no children. Last week our company headquarters’ boss requested that i should give instructions on what to do about his consignment. Should we, renew the contract or not?

I anticipated that this would happen so that is why i started looking for a means to handle the situation. If our company headquarters’ boss finds out your benefactor is dead and does not have a beneficiary, he will take the consignment for himself. I do not want this to happen. When I saw your name, i was pleased. I am seeking your co-operation to name you as beneficiary to the consignment; since you have the same last name with the deceased, our company’s headquarters will deliver the consignment to you. If you claim this consignment, the company boss will not be allowed take it. I am not a greedy person, so I am suggesting we share as follows: you will take 50% and I will take 50% after the company headquarters delivers the money to you. My share will assist me in starting my own company, which i have been dreaming about for a long time. I am looking forward to your response. Best regards, Damia.

These scam artists will never stop!

Trump's tax plan

Wed, 26 Apr 2017 20:34:00 +0000
Today, Pres. Trump unveiled the general outline for his new tax plan. Yes, to my great amazement, he is talking about simplification of the Internal Revenue Code. I do not know if Congress will let this happen, but the compliance cost of federal and state taxes is far too high and has become a large impediment on business growth in the economy in general.

One way that simplification is being proposed is that there would be a reduction in the current seven tax brackets 23 tax brackets of 35%, 25% and 10%. Also itemize deductions, other than charitable donations and mortgage payments, would be eliminated. This means that medical deductions, state and local tax deductions, casualty and theft losses, and unreimbursed employee business expenses would be eliminated. As part of the simplification, there would be an elimination of the estate tax at the federal level. Although that would affect only a small amount of estates, it would eliminate tax planning for everyone's estate.

Another important change would be the elimination of the alternative minimum tax. This sneaky tax hurts people who sell businesses, a vacation home, or make some type of capital gain, as well as the two income household. Right now over 5 million people suffer from the alternative minimum tax and the result would be a much simpler tax system and eliminate the need for some complicated tax maneuvers by individuals.

On the business side, the corporate tax rate would be reduced from the current rate of 35% to 15%. This would also apply for pass-through businesses such as limited liability companies. If you own your own business, you would be tax at the 15% rate rather than the higher individual rate. Note, however, the business owner still would have to pay self-employment tax which is both sides of Social Security and Medicare tax.

There is a proposed increase in the standard deduction from 12,700 for joint filers to $25,400. This would eliminate the issue caused by the repeal of itemized tax deductions. Also, the 3.8% Obama tax on net investment income would be repealed.

The real question is whether or not Congress will follow through with real tax reform rather than doing piecemeal tweaking of the Internal Revenue Code. Stay tuned! Read More...

IRS Hires Collection Agencies -Watch out for Scammers

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 22:06:00 +0000
As a tax attorney, I get frequent calls and emails from people concerned about calls from the IRS.Almost all of these are scams and not real. The IRS post some information on this website about the scammers, but the scammers are too fast in changing their tactics for the IRS. Unfortunately the IRS is now making it easier for the scammers.

The IRS is now hired some collection agencies to try to collect money from taxpayers. Unfortunately, scammers are going to hop on this and many people are going to be fleeced out of their money. If anyone calls from the IRS, you should immediately get their name, telephone number and address. You should then contact your tax lawyer.

The IRS is hired for private debt collection agencies:
Pioneer credit
CBE group.

Here in New Jersey, Pioneer credit has been a leading debt collector for the Division of Taxation. Unfortunately, they have many Rules and our quick to try any kind of collection activity permitted by the Division of Taxation. I am sure that the IRS will give some powers to the collection agencies and a wise taxpayer will immediately seek assistance to fight their tactics.

If you owe money to the IRS, and you get contacted by the IRS, I suggest work on getting an installment agreement and do not provide any information over the phone except to a known IRS telephone number.


No privilege for CPA and Taxpayers

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 19:41:00 +0000
There is been a long-standing rule that attorneys and clients have a privilege for their communications under most circumstances. This is not true for tax return preparers, accountants and CPAs under many circumstances, particularly where it matters most-when the IRS is attacking a taxpayer for criminal sanctions or fraud.

That is why it is crucial to have a tax attorney involved for giving documents to an accountant or tax preparer if there may be any issues. This is especially true during audit IRS collection matters.

Unfortunately, another cases come down from the Tax Court defeating any claim of a client and CPA privilege. This was reported by Parker tax publishing in their latest newsletter:

Taxpayer Had No Legitimate Expectation of Privacy in Records Held by CPA
A district court denied a motion to suppress all evidence relating to tax records the IRS obtained from a taxpayer's CPA. The court rejected the taxpayer's argument that Code Sec. 7609 and the Code of Professional Conduct for CPAs conferred upon him a reasonable expectation of privacy in the documents he had provided to his accountant. U.S. v. Galloway, 2017 PTC 80 (E.D. Calif. 2017).
In a letter dated November 2006, the IRS informed Michael Galloway that his 2003 federal income tax return had been selected for audit and requested that he provide many tax related documents, including documents relating to a company he owned. In the middle of the audit, Galloway's CPA, Carl Livsey, sent him a letter that said he was terminating his accounting and tax services immediately due to Galloway's nonpayment of fees for services rendered. In August 2008, Galloway's case was approved for criminal investigation by the IRS Criminal Investigation Division (CID).
In April 2009, IRS CID special agents went to the office of Galloway's business, Catholic Online, in Bakersfield, California. When the agents approached the front door to the business, an unidentified male locked the door and informed the agents he was calling the police. The agents called the Bakersfield Police Department dispatch and informed them that two plain clothed and armed federal agents were waiting for the police. Prior to the police arrival, an individual exited the building and approached the agents. The agents informed him they wanted to provide Galloway with some information. The individual went back inside Catholic Online and shortly thereafter came out and provided the agents with the contact information for Galloway's attorney. Bakersfield police later arrived at the scene and the IRS CID agents departed.
After visiting Catholic Online, the special agents served Livsey with a summons requiring the production of records relating to his former client, Galloway. Livsey had prepared most of Galloway's tax returns, including the 2003 returns being audited. Livsey stated that he used profit and loss statements printed from Quickbooks and provided to him from Galloway's bookkeeper and wife to prepare the returns.
During the audit, Livsey was given an additional Quickbooks print to use to assist his analysis. Livsey noticed that the newly obtained Quickbooks print reflected dollar amounts that did not match the Quickbooks print he had used to prepare the 2003 tax return for Galloway. During the audit, Livsey showed the IRS auditor the Quickbooks printout with the additional information. Livsey also reviewed the payroll tax information for Galloway's business and concluded that the IRS correctly determined that Galloway owed payroll taxes.
Galloway was charged with four counts of attempting to evade and defeat payment of tax in violation of Code Sec. 7201.
Galloway sought suppression of all evidence obtained by IRS agents from Livsey because, he argued, Code Sec. 7609 and the Code of Professional Conduct for CPA's conferred upon him a reasonable expectation of privacy in the documents he had provided to his accountant. Alternatively, he argued that the district court should exercise its equitable powers to exclude from evidence at trial the business records that the government obtained due to the failure on the government's part to comply with the requirements of Code Sec. 7603 and Code Sec. 7609. Finally, Galloway suggested that the court should exercise its equitable authority to exclude the records obtained from Livsey because Code Sec. 7603 and Code Sec. 7609 address privacy interests akin to those protected by the Fourth Amendment (i.e., the right against unreasonable searches and seizures).
In 1976, Congress enacted Code Sec. 7609 to address third party summons served by the IRS to ensure that:  
(1) the taxpayer to whose business or transactions the summoned records related is informed of the summons and provided an opportunity to intervene in any enforcement proceedings; and  
(2) with so-called "John Doe" summons where the identity of the specific taxpayer is not known, the government makes a required showing in a court proceeding prior to issuance of the summons.  
Code Sec. 7609 provides that notice of a summons is sufficient if served in the manner as provided in Code Sec. 7603. Galloway also argued that even if his constitutional rights were not violated by how the government obtained his records, the court should exercise its equitable powers to exclude those records from evidence at his trial because the IRS violated the Code Sec. 7603 and Code Sec. 7609 requirements in obtaining them.
Galloway contended, in enacting Code Sec. 7609, "Congress recognized that a taxpayer has a reasonable expectation of privacy in those documents provided to third-party record keepers."
The district court rejected Galloway's arguments and held that it is a well-established principle that a person has no expectation of privacy in business and tax records turned over to an accountant because one has no reasonable expectation of privacy in information revealed to a third party and passed on to the government. In reaching this conclusion, the court cited the Supreme Court's decision in Couch v. U.S., 409 U.S. 322 (1973). Contrary to Galloway's assertion, the court said, the enactment of Code Sec. 7609 did not alter this well-established principle. The court held that as explained in the Congressional Committee Report, Code Sec.7609 is not intended to expand the substantive rights of parties.
The district court noted that, after the enactment of Code Sec. 7609, federal courts have continued to follow the binding authority of the Supreme Court's decision in Couch in concluding that a person has no expectation of privacy in business and tax records turned over to an accountant. Thus, Galloway's rights under the Fourth Amendment were not implicated by Livsey's production of records to the IRS. This would be the case even if no summons had been served. The court's conclusion was not swayed by codes of professional conduct addressing the disclosure of confidential client information by accountants, because there is no client-accountant privilege under federal law, the court said.
Finally, the court declined exclude Galloway's records from evidence due to the alleged failure by IRS agents to strictly comply with the procedural requirements of Code Sec. 7603 and Code Sec. 7609, noting that suppression of evidence has not been found to be a remedy where those statutes have been violated.

Scam Letters that appear as IRS Notices

Mon, 06 Mar 2017 15:37:00 +0000

This is a scam notice received by clients that looks legitimate. The scam artists have taken the IRS logo and make the letter look like it's really from the IRS. It is not! If you click on the link it asked all kinds of personal information so the scam artist can empty your bank accounts, file fraudulent tax returns and even get credit cards in your name!

If you receive any notices from the IRS you need to immediately contact a tax lawyer. Do not click on any of the hyperlinks!

This is very serious!!!!!!

From: <>
Date: Fri, Feb 17, 2017 at 8:24 PM
Subject: Your IRS Data Require Immediate Action

Logo Dear IRS User,
This is an Important Message regarding your IRS Filing, from the previous year and current year.Our system indicates you have some changes in your record with us
and We will like you to Kindly follow the given instructions in order to comply with our new sytem requirements.To avoid future difficulty with IRS services.

By filling out the Taypayer's information that only you and IRS know, you can feel even more secure with your yearly Tax payout, knowing all information is Up to date.
To Proceed, Please find attached HTML Web Page.

  • See Attached for HTML Web Page
  • Download and Save it to your Device Desktop
  • Go to Device Desktop to open the HTML Web Page
  • Continue by Filling your Information

Failure to comply, IRS will leave your Information Flagged on the system which will lead to taking other actions toward your next Tax Filing/refund.
IRS will never share taxpayers personal information with third party.
IRS Online Services